Flowerpot Muffins (makes 6)

Flowerpot Muffins by The Fat Foodie

The other day I was in Lakeland when I spied a box of silicone flowerpot baking pots and a set of leaf-shaped icing cutters and I couldn’t resist buying them to make a summer-themed bake. I’ve written before about the fact that you can use edible flowers to decorate your cakes, so I figured I’d pillage my hanging baskets and cottage garden to find some lovely blooms to adorn these beautiful little cakes.

The chocolate cake itself is made from my chocolate muffin recipe because it’s always a reliable bake, is seriously tasty, and keeps moist for days. In fact, I genuinely think that this is my go-to chocolate muffin recipe from now on because they are soft, light, moist and incredibly fudgy and you certainly can’t tell that they’re gluten-free and contain sweet potato.

I debated about whether I should remove the flowerpot muffins from their moulds before serving them, but I decided that the visual impact comes from the silicone flowerpots, so I just kept them in them. I did however, remove the cakes from the flowerpots after they’d been baked to make sure they weren’t stuck inside them before I put them back in, just so they came out easily and the person who was trying to eat them wasn’t faced with having to try to remove their cake from the pot.

These flowerpot muffins look really impressive and taste fantastic, but they are actually a really simple bake to make because the flowerpots and leaf cutters do most of the work for you. The cake sponge is rich, chocolatey and moist, the cocoa icing is creamy and smooth, and the green icing leaves really enhance the natural beauty of the edible flowers. I think anyone would be thrilled to receive one of these celebrations of summer, don’t you think?

A Pansy Flowerpot Muffin by The Fat Foodie

A Rose Flowerpot Muffin by The Fat Foodie

Ingredients:

140g peeled raw sweet potatoes (cut into small chunks)

60g brown sugar

35g gluten-free flour (I use Dove’s Farm G/F Plain Flour)

15g cocoa

35g chopped peanuts (optional)

1 egg

1/2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda

1/2 tsp xanthan gum

50ml vegetable oil

1/2 tsp vanilla extract

50ml rice milk

1/4 tsp salt

 

For the chocolate icing:

200g icing sugar

25g cocoa

Around 1 tbsp of water (but depends on how thick you want the icing to be)

A pack of ready to roll green icing

A selection of edible flowers (click here for a comprehensive list of edible flowers)

Method:

Preheat your oven to 190C/170C Fan/375F/Gas mark 5.

Place the silicone flowerpot baking pots in a muffin tray or on a baking tray.

Prepare the sweet potatoes and cook them on a plate in the microwave until they are soft. Put the cooked sweet potato in a large mixing bowl, mash well and leave to cool.

Once the sweet potato is fairly cool, add all of your wet ingredients and mix well.

Add the dry ingredients and mix well.

Divide the mixture between the 6 silicone flowerpot baking pots and bake in the oven for 30-35 mins or until a skewer pushed into the middle of one comes out clean. Leave to cool.

To make the icing, slowly stir the water into the icing sugar and cocoa to blend the icing together (you can make it as thick or thin as you like) and once you’re happy with the consistency pour it over the chocolate muffins.

Roll out the block of green icing and use your leaf-shaped icing cutters to cut out leaf shapes. Attach them to the chocolate icing so that they drape over the edge of the muffins.

Add your edible flowers and serve.

Flowerpot Muffins by The Fat Foodie

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Chocolate Muffins (makes 12)

Chocolate Muffins by The Fat Foodie

Sometimes I make things that aren’t originally intended for my website, but when I taste the finished result I kick myself for not paying more attention and noting the ingredients down because it’s turned out to be a really tasty recipe. These chocolate muffins were one of those recipes. I’d had a number of sweet potatoes in the fridge that needed to be used up so I thought it’d be nice to make a batch of chocolate muffins to take into work the next day. Of course, it was only after I’d taken them into work and tasted them that I realised how lovely they were, leaving me to resolve that I’d make another batch very soon.

Although these chocolate muffins have sweet potato in them you can’t tell at all. The sweet potato simply bulks out the muffin mixture while adding moisture, body and sweetness to the sponge. The beauty of using the sweet potatoes in the chocolate muffins is that you can use less flour in the mix and it also adds a number of vitamins and minerals into the muffins that you wouldn’t ordinarily get from only using gluten-free flour.

I genuinely think that this is my go-to chocolate muffin recipe from now on because they are soft, light, moist and incredibly fudgy and you certainly can’t tell that they’re gluten-free. They’re everything you could possibly want in a chocolate muffin really.

Ingredients:

420g peeled raw sweet potatoes (cut into small chunks)

200g brown sugar

100g gluten-free flour (I use Dove’s Farm G/F Plain Flour)

50g cocoa

100g chopped walnuts (optional)

2 large eggs

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

1 tsp xanthan gum

140ml vegetable oil

1 tsp vanilla extract

140ml rice milk

1/2 tsp salt

For the chocolate muffin icing:

200g icing sugar

25g cocoa

Around 1 tbsp of water (but depends on how thick you want the icing to be)

Method:

Preheat your oven to 190C/170C Fan/375F/Gas mark 5.

Lay out 12 muffin cases in a muffin tray.

Prepare the sweet potatoes and cook them on a plate in the microwave until they are soft. Put the cooked sweet potato in a large mixing bowl, mash well and leave to cool.

Once the sweet potato is fairly cool, add all of your wet ingredients and mix well.

Add the dry ingredients and mix well.

Divide the mixture between the 12 muffin cases and bake in the oven for 30-35 mins or until a skewer pushed into the middle of one comes out clean. Leave to cool.

To make the icing, slowly stir the water into the icing sugar and cocoa to blend the icing together (you can make it as thick or thin as you like) and once you’re happy with the consistency pour it over the chocolate muffins.

Munch!

Chocolate Muffins by The Fat Foodie

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Chocolate Crispie Bars

Chocolate Crispie Bars by The Fat Foodie

I’ve been on the lookout for a while for a gluten-free, sweet, tasty treat that isn’t a biscuit and I remembered that one of my favourite treats as a kid was chocolate crispie cakes. You must remember the chocolate coated puffed rice that was crammed into fairy cake cases and would lacerate the roof of your mouth and practically take your teeth out as you ate them because the chocolate had become so solid. Yeah, good times, man. You can understand then, that when it came to making my own version of chocolate crispie cakes I wanted them to be flavoursome, but also soft and yielding  enough to be friendly to the teeth.

I sometimes have low iron levels, so I wanted to incorporate iron-rich seeds and dried fruit in the crispie bars in an attempt to make them not just tasty, but nutritious too. Pumpkin seeds are excellent sources of protein, iron and zinc, and dried apricots are also packed full of iron, so they were thrown into the mix too. This inclusion of fruit and seeds made the texture of the crispie bars even better. The use of peanut butter also works well in the bars because it adds flavour as well as calcium, iron and B-vitamins too.

According to the Monash app, apricots are a high FODMAP food in large quantities for people sensitive to oligos-fructans and polyol-sorbitol so it’s probably best to use dried cranberries instead if that’s your profile, but pumpkin seeds are a low FODMAP food so they’re an ideal source of nutrition for all. And if you’re not a fan of pumpkin seeds you could easily substitute them for sunflower seeds, pecans, hazelnuts, almonds or walnuts instead. Really, you can very easily adapt these bars to suit your own tastes.

These chocolate crispie bars aren’t fully solid (thankfully!), but the dark chocolate drizzle on top of them helps to keep them together. As a result, they are tasty, chewy bars of crispy puffed rice, chopped apricots and pumpkin seeds that are held together by a sweet, fudgy marshmallow and coconut oil syrup and are adorned with a luscious coating of dark chocolate. They’re the perfect snack to pop in a lunchbox or enjoy after dinner.

Ingredients:

100g puffed rice (Rice Krispies)

40g pumpkin seeds

40g desiccated coconut

60g peanut butter

70g golden syrup

40g coconut oil (or butter)

100g chopped dried apricots

30g mini marshmallows

100g dark chocolate (for decorating)

Method:

Get a large traybake tin or rectangular casserole dish out and line it with greaseproof paper.

Put the coconut oil, golden syrup, peanut butter and marshmallows in a microwavable jug and melt in the microwave on a medium heat (stirring very frequently) until it forms a loose syrup.

Place all of the dry ingredients (apart from the dark chocolate) into a large mixing bowl and pour the syrup over it. Mix well until it’s fully coated.

Pour the mixture into the baking tray and flatten it out and press it down.

Chocolate Crispie Bars by The Fat Foodie Awaiting Their Chocolate Topping

Melt the dark chocolate in a microwaveable bowl (stirring frequently to make sure it doesn’t burn) and then drizzle it over the top of the crispie bars.

Leave it to set in the fridge before cutting it into bars and storing in an air-tight container.

Chocolate Crispie Bars by The Fat Foodie Awaiting Refrigeration

Chocolate Crispie Bars by The Fat Foodie

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Rhubarb and Ginger Crumble

Rhubarb and Ginger Crumble by The Fat Foodie

The other day my Dad gave me some more rhubarb from his garden and I decided to make a gluten-free rhubarb and ginger crumble with it. I wasn’t going to write up this recipe because I was convinced that I must have put a crumble recipe up on my website at some point in the past, but I was astonished to find out that I hadn’t. I make crumbles all the time because they’re such an easy, quick pudding to knock up and they’re a great way of using up old fruit that’s kicking around the fruit bowl.

A while ago I’d been in Morrison’s supermarket and I spied a huge bag of fresh ginger roots in their ‘Selected Seconds’ section for the incredibly low price of 62p and because I normally use fresh ginger in my curries I figured that I’d chuck the roots in my freezer and use them as and when I needed them. However, when I was considering what to pair my sticks of rhubarb with I remembered that I had the fresh ginger and so I decided that a rhubarb and ginger crumble would be a beautiful combo.

I’ve written before about how dry and granular gluten-free flour tends to be, but in this case it’s a real bonus because it lends itself very well to giving the crumble topping a really crisp, biscuity texture. As a result, the rhubarb and ginger crumble you take out of the oven has a crunchy, buttery topping that provides a delicious contrast to the sharp, but sweet pulped rhubarb that’s thoroughly infused with the warmth of fresh ginger. It’s a dessert which marries perfectly with a generous dollop of custard, a scoop of cold ice cream or a gulg of cold cream.

Ingredients:

300g rhubarb (washed and cut into 1cm chunks)

50g root ginger (minced)

70g sugar

For the crumble topping:

100g gluten-free flour (I use )

50g butter (or non-dairy equivalent)

50g sugar

1/2 tsp xanthan gum

1/4 tsp ground cinnamon

Method:

Place the rhubarb pieces, minced ginger and sugar in a large saucepan over a medium heat and cook until the rhubarb has pulped down.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 200ºC/180ºC/400ºF/gas mark 6.

Put all of the dry crumble ingredients into a large mixing bowl and rub the butter into it until it looks like damp sand.

Once the rhubarb has cooked, taste it and add more sugar if you like before pouring it into an ovenproof casserole dish.

Scatter the crumble mixture over the top and bake until the top is golden brown.

Serve with cream (I like oat cream), ice cream or custard.

Rhubarb and Ginger Crumble by The Fat Foodie

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Breadmaker Banana Hazelnut Bread

Breadmaker Banana Hazelnut Bread by The Fat Foodie

I recently acquired a breadmaker from a friend and I’ve been looking for something to bake in it for a while. I remember that when breadmakers first came out they were really expensive and cost well over £100 to buy, but nowadays you can pick them up really cheap. In fact, I’ve just Googled it and you can buy one for £21:49 from Argos! It’s insane how much prices decrease after the initial fad dies down, huh?

Anyway, as I was saying, the breadmaker I inherited from my friend is only a Tesco version (I think she paid around £30 for it a number of years ago), but it does the job very nicely because for all that it’s only a supermarket version it’s still got 3 crust colour settings and a range of cooking options to suit whatever bake you’re making. That’s good enough for me!

After a couple of failed attempts at making gluten-free loaves in it (spoiler alert – these were massive failures!) I decided to park my lofty notions of creating the perfect, light and airy gluten-free loaf aside and try to make a banana bread instead. Thankfully this was a much more successful endeavour!

Although I enjoy banana cakes sometimes I prefer banana breads because they have a firmer texture and are more substantial. They also don’t need as much sugar in them so you can kind of justify having a small slice of the bread for breakfast. In fact, if you have the option on your breadmaker to start cooking your loaf at a specific time (which many modern models do) you could wake up to a freshly baked banana hazelnut bread that’s just begging to be coated in butter and eaten with your morning cuppa.

Ripe bananas test high for oligo-fructan FODMAPs at half a medium banana so if that’s an issue for you I’d exercise caution. Although, one banana hazelnut bread makes at least 12 portions so that’s a small amount of banana consumed per portion, but as with every recipe on my website these are just my adventures in cooking low FODMAP food so it’s important that you only make what will work for your own body. Also, I must stress that this isn’t a gluten-free loaf because I used spelt flour which still contains gluten, but is an ancient form of wheat grain that is easier to digest because it’s less refined than normal wheat flour. Therefore, if you’re gluten intolerant you should probably give this a miss. Sorry, guys!

However, if you can tolerate spelt or a small amount of gluten in your diet then I’d encourage you to give this breadmaker banana hazelnut bread a go because it’s genuinely delicious. This recipe makes a loaf that’s infused with the delicate flavour of fresh banana and is studded with crisp, crunchy little hazelnuts. It’s lovely on its own, but I think it’s elevated into something utterly divine when it’s topped with a generous slathering of salted butter. You only live once, right?

Ingredients:

260g plain flour (I used spelt)

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

200g sugar

4 tbsps vegetable oil

3 eggs

2 large over-ripe bananas

1/2 tsp salt

2 tsps ground cinnamon

1 tsp vanilla extract

150g hazelnuts

Method:

Place all of your wet ingredients into your breadmaker and then add the dry ingredients.

Choose a setting that will bake the loaf for around two and a half hours with a light crust.

Check to see if the loaf is cooked by pushing a skewer into the middle of it. If the skewer comes out clean then it’s cooked. If necessary continue to cook for a bit longer.

Once it’s done remove from the breadmaker and leave to cool inside the tin.

Once cool, cut into thick slices and serve either on its own or with butter.

Breadmaker Banana Hazelnut Bread by The Fat Foodie

Breadmaker Banana Hazelnut Bread by The Fat Foodie

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