Week 6: The Lactose Challenge

Last Friday Lesley and I had our final elimination phase consultation and she was happy for me to begin the reintroduction phase the following week because my gut had completely quietened down. After going through an extensive questionnaire which helped her to determine if it was safe for me to go forward onto the reintroduction phase we decided that I would try to challenge lactose the following week.

You don’t have to eliminate dairy during the elimination phase as long as you use lactose-free products instead, but I have a mild dairy allergy, so I had cut it out of my diet during elimination in order to make sure that any symptoms I was having as a result of the dairy allergy weren’t being confused with any FODMAP responses.

I’d also like to point out that during the reintroduction phase it’s important that you still eat the strictly low FODMAP foods you eat in the elimination phase, with the exception of the food that you’re testing on reintroduction. That way you know that if you have a reaction it’s due solely to the high FODMAP food you’re testing and not something else you’ve incorporated into your diet.

I was looking forward to this challenge because I’ve really missed having real butter on my toast and in sandwiches. I’d even missed cheese even though I’m not a big cheese eater, so I was keen to test my response to it.

During our consultation Lesley did a great job of explaining to me how the reintroduction phase works for each of the FODMAPs I’ll be testing, so I knew that on Monday I was to drink 125ml of normal milk, on Tuesday 250ml of milk and on Wednesday 375ml of milk. This was fairly easy for me to take because I just made myself decaf lattes every morning to test my reactions.

It’s funny because I thought I’d enjoy the taste of the lattes more than I actually did and I realised that I’d become so used to drinking non-dairy milks, such as hemp, rice and oat, that they’d became my new norm. As a result, I decided that regardless of the lactose response I had I’m definitely going to stick to drinking non-dairy milk.

Getting back to the lactose challenge, I was pleased to find that I had no ill-effects on the three days I drank the milk apart from nasal congestion which I attribute to my diagnosed milk allergy, so I thought I was doing well at tolerating the lactose, but on Wednesday evening I had a full-blown spasm attack which lasted all day Thursday too. Another weird effect of the lactose challenge is that whereas ordinarily I’m IBS-D the lactose had led to me having much more solid stools and having a bit of IBS-C which was very odd for me!

Lesley had stressed to me that I was to keep her informed about how each of the challenges went, so it was with disappointment that I messaged her on Wednesday evening and told her about my reaction. She reassured me that it could have been the cumulative effect of having lactose three days in a row which had led to my reaction, but she also said that I might be able to tolerate small amounts of lactose, but maybe not every day. Lesley then advised me to spend the rest of the week eating very low FODMAP again in order to re-settle my gut in preparation for testing a new FODMAP group next week.

Today is Friday and I now feel much better. My gut is once again calm and I’m confident that by Monday morning I’ll be able to start a fresh FODMAP challenge although I’ve yet to decide which one. I had planned on testing fructans, specifically bread, but I’m not sure if I’m ready to deal with another spasm attack quite so soon, so I suspect I might pick a group that I’m fairly sure I can tolerate well, such as sorbitol. I’ll decide when Monday comes around.

If there’s one thing that the lactose challenge has taught me it’s that reintroducing FODMAPs is not an exact science and it’s about finding out your different levels of tolerance. On that note, I think I’ll re-test lactose again in the future, but I’ll probably follow this method instead:

Sunday: 125 ml milk

Monday: Low FODMAP

Tuesday: 250ml milk

Wednesday: Low FODMAP

Thursday: 375ml milk

Friday: Low FODMAP

Saturday: Low FODMAP

By following this system I hope that I can monitor my body’s reaction to different quantities of lactose by seeing how it reacts the day after each ‘dose’ of lactose.

As always during this process I’ll keep you informed about how I get on with each of the challenges.

Low fodmap workshop

Lesley’s also running an ‘Introduction to the Low FODMAP Diet for IBS’ workshop on the 11th of May in Glasgow which is going to cover all of the important aspects of the low FODMAP diet. It’s a bespoke workshop which will cost £199 to attend (it’s normally £249) and this price includes a two course low FODMAP a la carte lunch in a top Glasgow restaurant.

The workshop will include:

  • Lesley will show you how you can improve your IBS symptoms.
  • You will learn the principles behind the low FODMAP diet and how to adapt recipes.
  • Understand what foods are allowed and what foods should be avoided.
  • How to decipher food labels.
  • All the information you will need to get started.
  • Advice on the Elimination and Rechallenge/Reintroduction stage.
  • Continued group support.
  • A freshly prepared 2 course A La Carte low FODMAP and gluten-free lunch at the first UK restaurant to offer a low FODMAP menu with a relaxed informal Q&A session during lunch with Lesley who will be happy to discuss general concerns you might have.
  • Plus you’ll get a Low FODMAP goody bag to take home with you!

I’m really excited to be going along to Lesley’s workshop because I love helping people to learn about how the low FODMAP diet works and how beneficial it can be in the treatment of IBS and I’m also really thrilled at having the opportunity to help people learn how to adapt recipes to become safely low FODMAP.

If you would like to book a space to attend the ‘Introduction to the Low FODMAP Diet for IBS’ workshop or if you have any questions you’d like to ask about the workshop then please contact Lesley by email at info@lesleyreiddietitian.co.uk

I think it’s going to be an excellent and very informative day and I’d be thrilled to see you there, but if you can’t make it then Lesley is also offering readers of The Fat Foodie 20% off the price of one-to-one individual consultations during April. Just email her at info@lesleyreiddietitian.co.uk to set up an appointment.

Lesley Reid, King’s College Professional FODMAP Qualified Dietitian

Here are the details for Lesley, the FODMAP Trained Dietitian, who is taking me through elimination:

Telephone:
07777640035

Email: info@lesleyreiddietitian.co.uk

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Week 5: The End of the Elimination Phase

At the start of this process I honestly never envisioned that I would need to stay in elimination for more than two to three weeks in total, so I am astonished to see that my body has needed to go through five weeks of elimination in order to fully quieten my gut down enough to safely begin the reintroduction phase. There are a few points within that process that I’d like to share with you first though.

At the start of week four I’d taken a homemade gluten-free chicken mayo sandwich to work for lunch and I ended up eating it with a knife and fork because the gluten-free bread had crumbled to pieces to such an extent that it couldn’t be picked up and eaten. This will be nothing new to anyone who regularly eats gluten-free bread, such as myself, but the final straw was the horrible taste of the dairy-free margarine I’d used in the sandwich.

I love butter and although I happily drink non-dairy milk and use non-dairy cheese on a regular basis I find that I can’t do without the taste of real butter (normally of the spreadable variety). So it was a hardship to adopt the habit of eating dairy-free margarine during the elimination phase, but I did it regardless.

However, on that Monday morning at work when my sandwich had fallen apart I hit a wall and decided that enough was enough (PMS was heavily involved in this, by the way), so I messaged Lesley, the dietitian who’s taking me through this process, and I ‘informed her’ that I was coming off elimination because I felt fine and I missed butter. Why lie, right? Here’s our conversation for your viewing pleasure…

Now, I’m not going to lie, I wasn’t happy with Lesley’s response because I was just so sick of being on elimination and having to put up with eating really unsatisfying margarine, but again, PMS had a lot of involvement in that. However, I acknowledged to myself that she was the expert and I replied:

I’m a bit embarrassed to share that response with you because the very next day after I’d tried to control how long I was staying in elimination it turned out that Lesley was completely right and I had a full-blown spasm attack which lasted for 3 days. Here’s how that went:

I am so grateful that Lesley responded in the kind, understanding and professional manner she did because quite frankly no other response could have been as rough as I was being on myself anyway.

However, the main point, and I cannot stress this enough, is that this is exactly why IBS sufferers need to do this process under the tutelage of a FODMAP trained dietitian, such as Lesley.

I am an educated woman and I know a lot about FODMAPs and how the FODMAP diet works, but I would have made the completely wrong choice about when to come off elimination had I not been going through this process with Lesley. I don’t know better than she does. She’s trained in this stuff and I’m not and that’s why I had to listen to her.

And let me tell you, I’m so glad that I did because my gut is now completely quiet. It’s still. It’s not even making ‘whale noises’ during the night. And it’s been like that for five consecutive days now.

[Poo talk alert!] I’ve even had a solid stool the past two mornings in a row. That never happens!

[Period talk alert!] Even more surprising for me is that although I’m on day two of my period right now I’m still not having any gut symptoms or bowel issues at all when usually I would.

It’s astonishing and more than a little exciting too because I feel as though I’m in control of my symptoms for the first time in ages. For that reason I can understand why people would choose to stay in the elimination phase eating only very low FODMAP foods, but it’ll never be me because firstly, I miss tasty higher FODMAP foods too much to exclude them permanently from my diet and secondly, I know it’s bad for the gut microbiome long-term.

Lesley and I have a consultation scheduled for Friday in which we’ll discuss my progress and she’ll determine whether I’m ready to move on to the reintroduction phase and I’m more than happy to leave that decision in her hands because she’s the expert.

If you’re living with IBS and you can’t get it under control or if you’re stuck in elimination and you’d like the help of someone who is FODMAP-trained to take you into reintroduction I could not think of someone better than Lesley Reid. You’d be helping yourself towards a happier gut future. (Her details are at the bottom of this post.)

Low fodmap workshop

Lesley’s also running an ‘Introduction to the Low FODMAP Diet for IBS’ workshop on the 11th of May in Glasgow which is going to cover all of the important aspects of the low FODMAP diet. It’s a bespoke workshop which will cost £199 to attend (it’s normally £249) and this price includes a two course low FODMAP a la carte lunch in a top Glasgow restaurant.

The workshop will include:

  • Lesley will show you how you can improve your IBS symptoms.
  • You will learn the principles behind the low FODMAP diet and how to adapt recipes.
  • Understand what foods are allowed and what foods should be avoided.
  • How to decipher food labels.
  • All the information you will need to get started.
  • Advice on the Elimination and Rechallenge/Reintroduction stage.
  • Continued group support.
  • A freshly prepared 2 course A La Carte low FODMAP and gluten-free lunch at the first UK restaurant to offer a low FODMAP menu with a relaxed informal Q&A session during lunch with Lesley who will be happy to discuss general concerns you might have.
  • Plus you’ll get a Low FODMAP goody bag to take home with you!

I’m really excited to be going along to Lesley’s workshop because I love helping people to learn about how the low FODMAP diet works and how beneficial it can be in the treatment of IBS and I’m also really thrilled at having the opportunity to help people learn how to adapt recipes to become safely low FODMAP.

If you would like to book a space to attend the ‘Introduction to the Low FODMAP Diet for IBS’ workshop or if you have any questions you’d like to ask about the workshop then please contact Lesley by email at info@lesleyreiddietitian.co.uk

I think it’s going to be an excellent and very informative day and I’d be thrilled to see you there, but if you can’t make it then Lesley is also offering readers of The Fat Foodie 20% off the price of one-to-one individual consultations during April. Just email her at info@lesleyreiddietitian.co.uk to set up an appointment.

Lesley Reid, King’s College Professional FODMAP Qualified Dietitian

Here are the details for Lesley, the FODMAP Trained Dietitian, who is taking me through elimination:

Telephone:
07777640035

Email: info@lesleyreiddietitian.co.uk

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Cucumber and Mint Salad (serves 4)

Cucumber and Mint Salad by The Fat Foodie

I’d say it’s fairly well known that I prefer my salads to be on the robust, substantial side, so it’ll not come as a surprise to you that this Cucumber and Mint Salad can be eaten either as a side dish to accompany a piece of grilled fish or chicken or on its own as a fresh lunch.

This Cucumber and Mint Salad in itself is very simple, comprising of just cucumber wedges, sliced bell pepper and cubes of salty feta cheese, but it’s elevated to something quite wonderful by the minty vinegarette it’s dressed in.

The standard vinegarette ingredients of white wine vinegar and olive oil are enhanced by the addition of dried mint and lime juice, creating a salad dressing which is tart, but herby at the same time. I’m not a big fan of salad dressings with a strong vinegar flavour, so I tend to make my vinegarette on the conservative side, but feel free to add more white wine vinegar or dried mint to yours, if you wish.

I make this Cucumber and Mint Salad a great deal because it’s perfect on the side of a piece of grilled salmon or chicken breast, but it also satisfies my appetite as a packed lunch at work. It’s just a great all-rounder salad choice.

Ingredients for the Salad Base:

1 cucumber (diced)

160g feta cheese (or non-dairy cheese)

1 red or yellow bell pepper

Ingredients for the Salad Dressing:

2 tbsps olive oil

1 tbsp white wine vinegar

1 tsp dried mint

The juice of 1 lime

1/2 tsp ground black pepper

1/2 tsp salt

Method:

Prepare the salad ingredients as directed and then place them in a large bowl.

Mix all of the salad dressing ingredients together and then toss it through the salad and serve.

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Banana and White Chocolate Cheesecake (serves 6-8)

Banana and White Chocolate Cheesecake by The Fat Foodie

This Banana and White Chocolate Cheesecake could be described as an amalgamation of a banoffee pie and a soft cheese cheesecake. The base is composed of crushed gluten-free digestive biscuits which are packed down to form a crunchy layer before being topped with sliced bananas and a creamy white chocolate cream cheese mixture.

I really like this Banana and White Chocolate Cheesecake because, unlike a lot of desserts, it’s very light and yet it has no problem satisfying my sweet tooth. I use dairy-free white chocolate in my cheesecake mixture, but you could use dark chocolate if you’d prefer. It’d make a beautiful contrast to the light colour of the sliced fresh bananas.

If you’re looking for a delicious low FODMAP dessert to make then I’d highly recommend this Banana and White Chocolate Cheesecake. I’ve made it countless times and it’s loved by the whole family.

Ingredients for the Base:

160g gluten-free digestives

60g melted butter (or non-dairy)

Ingredients for the Filling:

200g dairy-free white chocolate

160ml tinned coconut milk solids

100g lactose-free soft cheese (or non-dairy)

1 firm yellow banana (with no dark spots on the skin)

Method:

Put the tin of coconut milk in the fridge overnight. (This helps the coconut fat solidify and makes it easier to remove it from the tin the next day.)

Line an 7 inch circular removable base baking tin with greaseproof paper. (If you don’t have a removable base tin then just line a normal one with greaseproof, but make sure the greaseproof goes over the edges, so you can lift it out of the tin.)

Crush the digestives until it resembles sand and then mix in the melted butter. Pour it into the baking tin and press down to form a base. Put it in the fridge to solidify.

Melt the white chocolate in the microwave, stirring extremely frequently to ensure it doesn’t burn. (I stir it every 10-15 seconds because it can burn really fast!)

Place the tinned coconut milk solids (the firm white coconut fat from the tin) and soft cheese in a microwaveable jug and heat it until it is warm. Stir the white chocolate into it.

Line the digestive base with sliced bananas and then pour the white chocolate cheesecake mixture on top and then put it back in the fridge. (I decorated mine with some dried strawberries, but you could use some dark chocolate, if you prefer, or leave it plain.) Serve.

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And in paperback!


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