Rhubarb and Ginger Crumble

Rhubarb and Ginger Crumble by The Fat Foodie

The other day my Dad gave me some more rhubarb from his garden and I decided to make a gluten-free rhubarb and ginger crumble with it. I wasn’t going to write up this recipe because I was convinced that I must have put a crumble recipe up on my website at some point in the past, but I was astonished to find out that I hadn’t. I make crumbles all the time because they’re such an easy, quick pudding to knock up and they’re a great way of using up old fruit that’s kicking around the fruit bowl.

A while ago I’d been in Morrison’s supermarket and I spied a huge bag of fresh ginger roots in their ‘Selected Seconds’ section for the incredibly low price of 62p and because I normally use fresh ginger in my curries I figured that I’d chuck the roots in my freezer and use them as and when I needed them. However, when I was considering what to pair my sticks of rhubarb with I remembered that I had the fresh ginger and so I decided that a rhubarb and ginger crumble would be a beautiful combo.

I’ve written before about how dry and granular gluten-free flour tends to be, but in this case it’s a real bonus because it lends itself very well to giving the crumble topping a really crisp, biscuity texture. As a result, the rhubarb and ginger crumble you take out of the oven has a crunchy, buttery topping that provides a delicious contrast to the sharp, but sweet pulped rhubarb that’s thoroughly infused with the warmth of fresh ginger. It’s a dessert which marries perfectly with a generous dollop of custard, a scoop of cold ice cream or a gulg of cold cream.

Ingredients:

300g rhubarb (washed and cut into 1cm chunks)

50g root ginger (minced)

70g sugar

For the crumble topping:

100g gluten-free flour (I use )

50g butter (or non-dairy equivalent)

50g sugar

1/2 tsp xanthan gum

1/4 tsp ground cinnamon

Method:

Place the rhubarb pieces, minced ginger and sugar in a large saucepan over a medium heat and cook until the rhubarb has pulped down.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 200ºC/180ºC/400ºF/gas mark 6.

Put all of the dry crumble ingredients into a large mixing bowl and rub the butter into it until it looks like damp sand.

Once the rhubarb has cooked, taste it and add more sugar if you like before pouring it into an ovenproof casserole dish.

Scatter the crumble mixture over the top and bake until the top is golden brown.

Serve with cream (I like oat cream), ice cream or custard.

Rhubarb and Ginger Crumble by The Fat Foodie

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Breadmaker Banana Hazelnut Bread

Breadmaker Banana Hazelnut Bread by The Fat Foodie

I recently acquired a breadmaker from a friend and I’ve been looking for something to bake in it for a while. I remember that when breadmakers first came out they were really expensive and cost well over £100 to buy, but nowadays you can pick them up really cheap. In fact, I’ve just Googled it and you can buy one for £21:49 from Argos! It’s insane how much prices decrease after the initial fad dies down, huh?

Anyway, as I was saying, the breadmaker I inherited from my friend is only a Tesco version (I think she paid around £30 for it a number of years ago), but it does the job very nicely because for all that it’s only a supermarket version it’s still got 3 crust colour settings and a range of cooking options to suit whatever bake you’re making. That’s good enough for me!

After a couple of failed attempts at making gluten-free loaves in it (spoiler alert – these were massive failures!) I decided to park my lofty notions of creating the perfect, light and airy gluten-free loaf aside and try to make a banana bread instead. Thankfully this was a much more successful endeavour!

Although I enjoy banana cakes sometimes I prefer banana breads because they have a firmer texture and are more substantial. They also don’t need as much sugar in them so you can kind of justify having a small slice of the bread for breakfast. In fact, if you have the option on your breadmaker to start cooking your loaf at a specific time (which many modern models do) you could wake up to a freshly baked banana hazelnut bread that’s just begging to be coated in butter and eaten with your morning cuppa.

Ripe bananas test high for oligo-fructan FODMAPs at half a medium banana so if that’s an issue for you I’d exercise caution. Although, one banana hazelnut bread makes at least 12 portions so that’s a small amount of banana consumed per portion, but as with every recipe on my website these are just my adventures in cooking low FODMAP food so it’s important that you only make what will work for your own body. Also, I must stress that this isn’t a gluten-free loaf because I used spelt flour which still contains gluten, but is an ancient form of wheat grain that is easier to digest because it’s less refined than normal wheat flour. Therefore, if you’re gluten intolerant you should probably give this a miss. Sorry, guys!

However, if you can tolerate spelt or a small amount of gluten in your diet then I’d encourage you to give this breadmaker banana hazelnut bread a go because it’s genuinely delicious. This recipe makes a loaf that’s infused with the delicate flavour of fresh banana and is studded with crisp, crunchy little hazelnuts. It’s lovely on its own, but I think it’s elevated into something utterly divine when it’s topped with a generous slathering of salted butter. You only live once, right?

Ingredients:

260g plain flour (I used spelt)

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

200g sugar

4 tbsps vegetable oil

3 eggs

2 large over-ripe bananas

1/2 tsp salt

2 tsps ground cinnamon

1 tsp vanilla extract

150g hazelnuts

Method:

Place all of your wet ingredients into your breadmaker and then add the dry ingredients.

Choose a setting that will bake the loaf for around two and a half hours with a light crust.

Check to see if the loaf is cooked by pushing a skewer into the middle of it. If the skewer comes out clean then it’s cooked. If necessary continue to cook for a bit longer.

Once it’s done remove from the breadmaker and leave to cool inside the tin.

Once cool, cut into thick slices and serve either on its own or with butter.

Breadmaker Banana Hazelnut Bread by The Fat Foodie

Breadmaker Banana Hazelnut Bread by The Fat Foodie

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Quick Cook Dahl

Quick Cook Dahl by The Fat Foodie

Emma Hatcher, the author of the awesome low FODMAP cookbook The FODMAP Friendly Kitchen Cookbook, has a recipe for a dahl that’s made with just three tins and some spices. It’s a lovely dahl, but as an Indian food aficionado I prefer my curries to have a lot more flavour in them so although I make this quick cook dahl with the three tins Emma suggests, I also add a lot more spices to it which, in my humble opinion, makes the dahl more complex and tastier.

I normally make my dahls with dry red lentils, but tinned green lentils work very well in this curry because they keep their shape even after they’ve been cooked which helps to add texture to the curry. Also, the beauty of using tinned lentils is that the tinning process helps to reduce their FODMAP content, so you’re much less likely to have problems digesting them. (This would be the perfect opportunity to use a flatulence joke, but I’m much classier than that. Honest.)

This quick cook dahl can easily be made in a slow cooker if you’d like a meal ready to come home to after work, simply requiring you to throw the ingredients into the slow cooker and give it a stir before leaving the house, but it only takes about half an hour to make on the stove top too so it’s a great option for dinner if you don’t want to be standing cooking for ages when you get home.

This recipe makes a lovely creamy, substantial dahl that’s well-spiced, but not hot, and is packed full of flavour. It’s the perfect quick-to-cook, comforting vegetarian curry that’s just waiting to be topped with freshly chopped coriander leaves and served to accompany soft, fluffy boiled rice and crispy shards of poppadums. My own mouth is watering just thinking about it!

Ingredients:

1 tbsp vegetable oil

1 tbsp ground cumin

1 tbsp ground turmeric

2 tsps ground coriander

1 tsp asafoetida powder

A thumb-sized piece of fresh ginger (minced)

A handful of shredded green leek tops

1 tin of green lentils

1 tin of chopped tomatoes

1 tin of coconut milk

300g rice

30g chopped fresh coriander

Method:

If you’re using the slow cooker then just add everything into the slow cooker, stir well and then leave to cook throughout the day before serving with freshly cooked rice.

If you’re cooking this on the hob though, put the oil in a saucepan and then add the spices and cook them for a couple of minutes to release their flavours.

Drain and rinse the lentils and add them to the pot along with the coconut milk and chopped tomatoes.

Leave to simmer for 10-15 mins until hot and cook your rice during this time.

Stir two-thirds of the chopped fresh coriander through the dahl and then serve with soft, fluffy rice and rest of the fresh coriander.

Quick Cook Dahl by The Fat Foodie

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Chocolate Orange Carrot Muffins (makes 12)

Chocolate Orange Carrot Muffins by The Fat Foodie

I like taking cakes into work. I think it’s nice to bring something tasty into the staff room for everyone to be able to enjoy when they’re on their tea breaks and lunch. I always think that there’s something warming and cosy about having some cake available for everyone to partake in, should they choose. Let’s be honest, very few people turn their nose up at a nice bit of cake.

I bought some pretty muffin cases the other day that I wanted to test and after some consideration I settled upon the idea of making carrot cake muffins, but it didn’t sound very exciting to me so I went back to the drawing board and decided to add more flavours to the cakes and so I made chocolate orange carrot muffins instead. I’m so glad I did because they are divine!

If you want a moist cake that’s not going to dry out in a hot environment, such as a very warm staff room, then I’d heartily recommend incorporating two components: a good oil and some sort of fruit or vegetable. You can never go wrong with basing a cake around carrots or courgette because their water content works fantastically to introduce and retain moisture in cake sponge. It’s also a bonus that you can’t even taste the vegetables in the cake once they’ve been baked.

Also, although most cakes tend to add fat to the sponge base by using butter, sadly as it cooks a lot of the water from the butter will evaporate. It will also continue to evaporate the longer the cake sits waiting to be eaten too, whereas using sunflower or vegetable oil (which does not evaporate) will ensure that the fat content (and therefore, moisture) remains present even after it’s been baked in a hot oven. It’s science, innit?

Although these chocolate orange carrot muffins are gluten-free you can easily make them standard muffins by using the same quantity of normal self-raising flour and omitting the xanthan gum and bicarbonate of soda, and only using 1 tsp of baking powder. Although why not give the gluten-free version a go? They’re really tasty and you honestly cannot tell the difference!

These chocolate orange carrot muffins are gorgeous. They’ve got an incredibly soft and bouncy texture, are infused with rich, deep cocoa and have a lovely fresh zing from the orange zest. Their whipped chocolate orange buttercream frosting also does the entire flavour combination justice. Quite frankly I think I’ve outdone myself. Now, I wonder if the boss will like them enough to give me a paid day off…

Chocolate Orange Carrot Muffins by The Fat Foodie

Ingredients:

250g of grated carrots

250g brown sugar

250g gluten-free flour (I use Dove’s Farm G/F Plain Flour)

1 tsp xantham gum

50g cocoa powder

2 tsps baking powder

1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

250ml vegetable oil

1/2 tsp salt

3 eggs

The zest and juice of 1 orange (keep 2 tbsps of orange juice aside for the buttercream icing)

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 heaped tsp ground cinnamon

For the buttercream icing:

175g icing sugar

25g cocoa powder

50g butter (use dairy-free, if necessary)

2 tbsps orange juice

Method:

Preheat your oven to 200C/180C Fan/400F/Gas mark 6.

Lay 12 muffin cases out into a muffin tray.

Measure all of your ingredients into a large mixing bowl.

Quickly mix all of the ingredients together using an electric whisk and spoon the mixture equally into the muffin cases.

Bake in the oven for about 30 minutes or until a skewer pushed into the middle of a muffin comes out clean.

Freshly Baked Chocolate Orange Carrot Muffins by The Fat Foodie

Leave to cool and make the buttercream by placing all of the icing ingredients into a jug and whisking until light and whipped.

Once the cakes are completely cold decorate with the buttercream icing and enjoy.

Chocolate Orange Carrot Muffins by The Fat Foodie

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Mushroom Stroganoff (Serves 4-6)

Mushroom Stroganoff by The Fat Foodie

I love mushroom stroganoff because it’s a lovely light meal, but it’s also really filling and satisfying at the same time. However, every time I’ve made mushroom stroganoff in the past it’s been a traditional cream-based version and now that I’m a little wiser when it comes to avoiding high FODMAP foods I know that dairy-based stroganoffs don’t work for me. As a result, I went back to the drawing board (well, it’s more like a kitchen worktop, but the intention’s the same) and I formulated a version that’s much more tummy-friendly.

Now, the Monash app lists button, portobello and shiitake mushrooms as being a high FODMAP food if you’re sensitive to polyols-mannitol, but thankfully oyster mushroom are a low FODMAP food so that’s the type you need to use if you’re making this mushroom stroganoff. However, if you are sensitive to mushrooms in general I’d suggest either substituting the mushrooms for a vegetable that you can happily digest (such as green beans, bell peppers or courgette) or simply giving this recipe a miss. Better safe than sorry. However, if like me, you have no problem with eating small servings of oyster mushrooms then a joyous dinner awaits you!

Although this recipe for mushroom stroganoff is dairy-free it is still beautifully creamy thanks to the use of oat cream. It produces a mushroom stroganoff that is well-seasoned with sweet paprika, fresh thyme leaves and a dash of grated nutmeg, is rich and deeply flavoured with the woodland taste of oyster mushrooms, but still manages to remain light due to the inclusion of the chunks of plum tomatoes. The fresh lemon juice added at the end of the cooking process also lifts the stroganoff to make the whole dish taste fresh and vibrant. It’s a perfect quick-cook mid-week meal when simply served over a bed of fluffy long grain rice.

The Ingredients Needed to Make Mushroom Stroganoff by The Fat Foodie

Ingredients:

1 tbsp vegetable oil

100g oyster mushrooms

1 tbsp paprika (not smoked)

1 tsp fresh thyme leaves

1 tsp asafoetida powder

1/5 tsp grated nutmeg

1 tin of plum tomatoes (drained of their juice and chopped)

1 tbsp Worcestershire Sauce

1 Oxo vegetable stock pot melted into 200ml boiling water

250ml oat cream

A handful of chopped fresh parsley

The juice of 1 lemon

1 tbsp cornflour mixed with 2 tbsp cold water

400g long grain rice

Method:

Place a saucepan filled with water and 1 tsp of salt over a high heat and bring to the boil. (This pot is for cooking the rice.)

Meanwhile, place another large saucepan over a medium heat and add the oil. Once hot add the mushrooms and spices. Cook until the mushrooms are soft.

Put your rice into the pot of boiling water and cook until soft.

While the rice is cooking add the parsley, chopped tomatoes, vegetable stock, oat cream, lemon juice and Worcestershire Sauce to your stroganoff and cook until hot.

Stir the cornflour mixture into the stroganoff and allow to thicken.

Once the rice is soft, drain it and serve in bowls topped with the mushroom stroganoff.

Mushroom Stroganoff by The Fat Foodie

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